OEKO-TEX

What is STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX®?

STANDARD 100 is a globally standardized, independent testing and certification system for raw, semi-finished and finished textile products at all processing levels, and for any accessories used. End products are tested for harmful substances and then sold on the market can be awarded the STANDARD 100 label for marketing purposes. In the B2B sector, the certificate serves as proof that any required terms of delivery have been fulfilled. Testing for harmful substances in accordance with STANDARD 100 incorporates important legal regulations, numerous chemicals that pose a risk to health, including some that are not yet legally regulated, and a wide variety of health care parameters.

What is the goal of STANDARD 100?

The goals of product certification in accordance with STANDARD 100 are:

  1. To provide the end consumer with a reliable, manufacturer-independent product label for non-hazardous products that are tested in accordance with the STANDARD 100 criteria catalogue and, in doing so, to help to effectively protect the consumer from harmful substance in textiles.
  2. To provide targeted support for companies in the textile chain with the implementation of their intended human-ecological product safety, based on a scientific criteria catalogue and neutral laboratory tests.
  3. STANDARD 100 is intended to simplify and accelerate supply relationships for manufacturers and retailers who want to ensure product safety for their customers.
  4. It also aims to achieve legal conformity for importers, retailers and manufacturers as a result.

 

What is the goal of STANDARD 100?

The goals of product certification in accordance with STANDARD 100 are:

  1. To provide the end consumer with a reliable, manufacturer-independent product label for non-hazardous products that are tested in accordance with the STANDARD 100 criteria catalogue and, in doing so, to help to effectively protect the consumer from harmful substance in textiles.
  2. To provide targeted support for companies in the textile chain with the implementation of their intended human-ecological product safety, based on a scientific criteria catalogue and neutral laboratory tests.
  3. STANDARD 100 is intended to simplify and accelerate supply relationships for manufacturers and retailers who want to ensure product safety for their customers.
  4. It also aims to achieve legal conformity for importers, retailers and manufacturers as a result.

To what extent is STANDARD 100 a modular system?

The concept of the OEKO-TEX® tests for harmful substances is based on a modular system. This means that certification is available for every stage of the textile value creation chain, and that certificates from prior stages are recognized. A successful test therefore allows you to label the textiles or materials in question with the STANDARD 100 label once the certification is attained.

What criteria does Hohenstein use as the basis for testing textiles and accessory materials for harmful substances?

The OEKO-TEX® criteria catalogue contains a wide variety of test parameters. The central component of the STANDARD 100 are requirements, limit values and test methods based on science. In many cases, the test criteria and limit values go far beyond the applicable national and international standards. The inclusion of numerous additional potentially harmful substances strongly reflects the pioneering role that the STANDARD 100 has played for many years now.

Why is STANDARD 100 divided into four product classes?

As a basic principle, the tests for harmful substances in accordance with STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX® are based on the respective purposes of the textiles and materials. The following principle applies with that in mind: the more intensive the skin contact of a textile and the more sensitive the skin, the stricter the human-ecological requirements that need to be fulfilled.

What are the product classes?

Product class I:
Textiles and materials for babies and toddlers up to three years old: underwear, rompers, bed linen, bedding, and so on

Product class II:
Textile and materials, the surface of which mainly come into direct contact with the skin: underwear, bedding, towels, shirts, blouses, socks, and so on

Product class III:
Textiles and materials, the surface of which only come into direct contact with the skin to a minor extent: jackets, coats, outdoor textiles, and so on

Product class IV:
Furnishing materials for decorative purposes: table linen, curtains, upholstery fabrics, and so on